AIB: CALLING FOR GENDER EQUALITY

AIB: CALLING FOR GENDER EQUALITY

India’s top comedy group, AIB (All India Bakchod), released a new parody song with Kangana Ranaut on Monday, taking aim at the male-chauvinism that runs rampant through India’s Glamour Industry. Titled “Bollywood Diva Song“, the group took on the underlying hypocrisy in the “modern” avatar that is portrayed for audiences, when in reality the stereotypical attitudes against women have remained alive and festering under the surface. The song depicts the difficulties that many actresses face while working in Bollywood, because they are, quite simply, women. Known for her outspoken personality, Kangana is no stranger to controversy – and we love her for it! The parody was done in order to promote her upcoming movie, Simran, which releases on the 15th of September. The song also hits back at the recent controversy that engulfed Kangana when she accused Karan Johar for nepotism. If you haven’t yet seen the song, now is the time to stop reading this article, because we’re about to break it down for you. SPOILER ALERT! Subtle pointers regarding the obvious disparity in the treatment of both genders are present from the start of the song, when the light-boy is instructed to ensure the light fully illuminates the male lead (“marad”) on set in all his glory. Kangana is shown being handed a role of toilet paper that represents the terrible quality of the dialogue and the lack of depth in the character most female actors are made to play, as compared to the male lead. When she dares to go up to the Director to protest, he does not even remember who she is (even when she tells him...
MY AUNT WAS RAPED TO BECOME THE PERFECT WIFE

MY AUNT WAS RAPED TO BECOME THE PERFECT WIFE

They say that time is the best healer. Maybe they say that because time numbs a person to the pain. Or maybe because memories fade away eventually, and you are only left with scars that you cannot explain. Time may help people drift apart and go there own separate ways, but it certainly does not heal. Not always. I remember sitting with my cousins in one corner of the room as my mother and her sister furiously talked to each other in undertones. I remember pretending to play with the dolls while my little ears strained to hear every last whisper, every last hiss. It was late, perhaps after midnight. The house was deathly silent. All of us were crowded in that one room, as though waiting for the apocalypse. I did not know whom we were waiting for. Nobody would tell me anything. “Shhh. This is not for children! Play with your dolls,” was a constant response to any question I would pertain to ask. My cousins were keeping a cheery face, loudly playing with the dolls and toy cars strewn in our corner of the room. They weren’t fooling me for a minute. Suddenly, my khala rushed out the room and my mother got up to follow. “Stay here!” she ordered me when I tried to get up. I fell back, a little shocked. My mother had never spoken to me harshly before. They came back leading my second khala between them. Her name is Jugnu, meaning Firefly in English. She was leaning heavily on both her sisters, with my mamu bringing up the rear as he tried to support...
DIVINE IGNORANCE

DIVINE IGNORANCE

My father has (recently) increasingly been leaning towards his religious side. He has started attending dars, giving long lectures at the dinner table about the etiquettes of women in Islam and stressing on the superiority of men over women. Being his only daughter, I am subjected to constant recitations of the Quran (especially Surah Nisa) and increased reminders that “Haya” (modesty) is a girl’s only charm. He feels it incumbent upon himself to point out (with distressing frequency) that women must remain indoors. One of the religious clerics he prefers to listen to everyday, has emphasized that a woman’s one and only role is childbirth and childrearing – the rest, according to this esteemed cleric, has been imported from the West. Such western ideas, he goes on to say in a voice shaking with emotion, have acutely corrupted our society. He fears that the women and girls in Pakistan’s society have been the victims of negative exposure from the media, which is making them question their place in society and Islam – a blasphemous act. According to said preacher, “the right guidance of religion allows women to fit into society like the parts of a machine”, without asking too many questions. Talking about domestic violence which is prevalent in our society, he goes on to say that “the world is a very cruel place. Everyday there are so many cases of domestic abuse and cruelty. Nowadays, women and girls have started to ask for divorce on the slightest of excuses – it is almost as if it’s fashion. Parents should teach their daughters patience, since they know about the...